"Pay attention to the world." -- Susan Sontag
 

White Amaryllis, in Black-and-White

From On Light and Shadow by Michael Freeman:

“If the subject is unusual, and photographed in a way that isn’t completely obvious, there’s an advantage to flat, axial lighting in that it takes away the modelling clues that we would normally expect, and helps the image to be a little ambiguous. This isn’t so unexpected, because whatever basic image quality you remove from shooting, what remains steps up to be more prominent.

“In the same way, if you remove colour from imagery and shoot in black and white, the qualities of shape, form and line take over more.”


Hello!

For this post, I converted the color images from the previous post (see White Amaryllis) to black and white. While it may seem a little odd to render photos of white flowers this way, it’s interesting, I think, to see how flowers we consider white are actually a blend of white, yellow, and green — especially along those sections of the flower blossoms closest to the leaves and stems.

With that in mind, I included two extra galleries at the end of this post: one showing the color and black-and-white versions side-by-side, and a slideshow (using the “fade” effect that’s available with the WordPress slideshow block) that helps highlight the transition from color to monochrome.

Thanks for taking a look!








Red and Pink Amaryllis, in Black-and-White (3 of 3)

From “Amaryllis Through the Centuries” in Amaryllis by Starr Ockenga:

“Amaryllis: elegant, sensual, and mysterious….

“According to the classical poets Theocritus, Ovid, and Virgil, Amaryllis was a virginal nymph, timid and shy but with a spine of steel. She fell deliriously in love with Alteo, an icy-hearted shepherd reputed to be as handsome as Apollo and as strong as Hercules, and determined that she would be true only to him, no matter what the consequences. Indifferent to her charms, Alteo claimed his only desire was that a new flower be brought to him, a flower that had never before existed in the world….


“Amaryllis consulted the Oracle at Delphi and was instructed to pierce her heart with a golden arrow at Alteo’s door. This she did, dressed in maiden’s white, for thirty consecutive nights, dripping blood all the while. The shepherd finally opened his door to discover a flower with crimson petals, which had sprung from the blood of Amaryllis’s heart.”


Hello!

This is the last of three posts showing black-and-white conversions of the color photos I uploaded to:

Red and Pink Amaryllis (1 of 3);

Red and Pink Amaryllis (2 of 3); and

Red and Pink Amaryllis (3 of 3).

The first post in this black-and-white series is Red and Pink Amaryllis, in Black-and-White (1 of 3) and the second post is Red and Pink Amaryllis, in Black-and-White (2 of 3).

Thanks for taking a look!






Red and Pink Amaryllis, in Black-and-White (2 of 3)

From “Amaryllis Through the Centuries” in Amaryllis by Starr Ockenga:

“Victorian volumes devoted to decoding the language of flowers attribute to the amaryllis characteristics ranging from haughtiness, pride, and determination to timidity and shyness. In her Flora’s Dictionary (1829) Mrs. Elizabeth W. Wirt, credited with assembling the first floral dictionary in America, gave the meaning as ‘Splendid Beauty.’ A name with such romantic connotations, even contradictions, seems fitting for the queen of all bulbs.”

From The Botanic Garden by Erasmus Darwin, in Flora’s Dictionary by Elizabeth Washington Wirt:

When Heaven’s high vault condensing clouds deform,
Fair Amaryllis flies the incumbent storm;
Seeks, with unsteady step, the shelter’d vale,
And turns her blushing beauties from the gale.


Hello!

This is the second of three posts showing black-and-white conversions of the color photos I uploaded to:

Red and Pink Amaryllis (1 of 3);

Red and Pink Amaryllis (2 of 3); and

Red and Pink Amaryllis (3 of 3).

The first post in this black-and-white series is Red and Pink Amaryllis, in Black-and-White (1 of 3).

Thanks for taking a look!






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