Chapel Hill Yellow Lantana: Gallery 4 of 4

Here’s the final gallery of my Chapel Hill Yellow Lantana. You might think I’d run out of lantana photos by now; but that’s only true for the Chapel Hill Yellows. Coming soon, two other varieties: Landmark Citrus (the “citrus” moniker fits their bright orange, yellow, and pink or peach colors very well) and Mary Ann Lantana, with blooms blended from pink and shades of yellow.

The first two galleries in this series, as well as a gallery of one of my other lantana plants, are at these links:

Chapel Hill Yellow Lantana: Gallery 1 of 4

Chapel Hill Yellow Lantana: Gallery 2 of 4

Chapel Hill Yellow Lantana: Gallery 3 of 4

Wordless Wednesday: Chapel Hill Pink Huff Lantana

I’ve started collecting images from this site into galleries by subject, organizing them on pages available from the navigation bar at the top:

On these gallery pages, I’ll accumulate photos from across blog posts, adding them to existing pages or creating new ones as I write posts with images. It’s a work-in-progress, of course… and since I’ve uploaded about 1,500 images with my blog posts here… this may take some time… 🙂 … but I thought it would be a nice way to view the images scattered among the blogs, for those interested.

Thanks for taking a look!

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Chapel Hill Yellow Lantana: Gallery 3 of 4

Here’s the third of four galleries of my Chapel Hill Yellow Lantana.

The first two galleries in this series, as well as a gallery of one of my other lantana plants, are at these links:

Chapel Hill Yellow Lantana: Gallery 1 of 4

Chapel Hill Yellow Lantana: Gallery 2 of 4

Wordless Wednesday: Chapel Hill Pink Huff Lantana

Thanks for visiting and taking a look!

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Chapel Hill Yellow Lantana: Gallery 2 of 4

Here’s the second of four galleries of my Chapel Hill Yellow Lantana. I’ve included some of the larger blooms in this set, where I experimented with getting sufficient focus to show petal detail fully, by using a higher ISO and, in some cases, a bit of extra lighting by attaching an LED lamp to the camera. With the higher ISO and supplemental light, I could use narrower apertures and increase depth of field to capture most of the individual flowers in focus, despite hand-holding the camera nearly on top of the blooms.

Even fully opened, the flowers are smaller than a ping-pong ball, yet they have a depth and symmetry that’s enhanced by the color variations throughout the blooms — providing endless fascination for macro photographers (like me!). During post-processing, I used Lightroom’s Texture Control (see Before and After: Yellow and Green (and Lightroom Radial Filters)) to enhance each foreground and soften each background, along with reducing highlights and adding contrast within the blooms using the Dehaze Tool. These three adjustments together help shift focus from the additional background elements that got included by using narrower apertures, to the intensified detail in the flowers and their blooms.

Here are links to the first gallery in this series, as well as a gallery of one of my other lantana plants:

Chapel Hill Yellow Lantana: Gallery 1 of 4

Wordless Wednesday: Chapel Hill Pink Huff Lantana

Thanks for taking a look!

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Chapel Hill Yellow Lantana: Gallery 1 of 4

Lantana is one of many flowering shrubs that are popular with southeastern gardeners, that also have relatives with a reputation for invasiveness when they grow outside of curated spaces. I have four varieties, three whose size is easily managed because they’re in pots, and one in a sunny corner of the garden that explodes into long stems during May and June, then blooms through the end of June and into July. By August, when most of the blooms have fallen off, the plant continues to add leaves and lengthening stems, which become thicker and woodier until early autumn when growth stops. I cut the entire plant down to just a few inches above the ground every fall, and some of the stems are so hard they have to be sawed off like small tree branches rather than just pruned. That’s when I can relate to what a burden it would be if it became invasive: the tangled lengths of stiff stems skewer off in every direction and present a challenge to cut back even in a relatively small, confined area.

In 2001, its reputation for wildness got Lantana a starring role in a melodramatic crime thriller named after itco-starring some humans — where an outgrowth of the plant was used to hide a body in an attempt to conceal a murder. Every fall when I hack mine back to the ground, I remember that movie, and the mood the opening scene created by panning from colorful lantana blossoms to a shadowy thicket of twisted stems, to gradually juxtapose the beauty of the blooms with the evidence that a crime had occurred.

This gallery — and the next three, coming soon — are photos of Chapel Hill Yellow Lantana (a few taken last year and reprocessed, most taken this year), growing in a large pot where it produces a substantial number of blooms with consistent blends of pale white, yellow, and an orange color that always reminds me of orange sherbet. I showed one of my varieties in last week’s Wordless Wednesday (Wordless Wednesday: Chapel Hill Pink Huff Lantana), and I’m working on images of Mary Ann and Landmark Citrus variations for posting later this month.

I played around with light and focus on these Chapel Hills to create different kinds of compositions; this gallery is representative of the next three, where the blooms will be shown as larger and more plentiful. The yellows and oranges seemed to pop nicely against the backgrounds, especially where I intentionally darkened greens, enhanced shadows, and applied some vignetting to isolate the blooms.

Thanks for taking a look!

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Lantana Bonanza!

Earlier this spring, I added some Chapel Hill Yellow Lantana to a large pot in the center of my courtyard garden. It didn’t grow much at first, but as the daily rains we were getting in Georgia subsided, the plants started getting more sun and the blooms are now popping. My garden is mostly a shade garden with lots of ferns and hostas — in the ground and in pots — but I’ve learned over the years how to take advantage of those areas where the sun does get through for a few hours each day. I’ve experimented quite a bit with flowering plants like lantana, some sun-loving vines (and even a couple of grapevines) that may not flower but grow well anyway, hydrangeas placed to catch early morning or late day sun, and a mix of sun annuals that make it through the summer pretty well.

The Chapel Hill Yellow Lantana, I learned, is a cross between Miss Huff and New Gold lantana varieties, all popular in southern gardens for their hardiness and persistent flowering throughout late summer and even into autumn. The floral symmetry of lantana flowers fascinates me; I learned that this type of flower shape is called an umbel — evocative of umbrella given that it’s overall shape is supported from a single point by “umbrella like” ribs. As the flowers first emerge, they look to me like tiny pillows arranged in concentric circles, changing from pale to brighter yellow as they grow, then developing into a rich yellow with a dark orange center. Using a macro lens and some cropping, I’ve tried to show that transition in the images below, as there were suddenly plenty of flowers at different stages of growth to show the early buds, mixtures of buds and emerging flowers, and some clusters that were fully in bloom.

Select any of the pictures below to see larger sizes in a slideshow … and thanks for reading and taking a look!

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